CLOCKS AND MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS 

 

 

  

Dolmabahce Palace is completely a Western palace in terms of its musical instruments and notes. Besides the 9 pianos, 2 harmoniums, 2 organs, cellos, double basses and violins in the palace, also the archive of musical notes is a repertory intended for learning and playing Western music. Yıldız Şale and Beylerbeyi Palaces follow this track as well, having one piano each. Although Aynalıkavak Pavilion have been mentioned with a great Turkish music composer and Ney player Selim III (1789-1807), there is no musical instrument remained from the original of the Pavilion. However, the collection that began with the musical instruments, musical notes and gramophone records given as free gifts by the deceased Gevherî Osmanoğlu, who is granddaughter of Sultan Abdülaziz (1861-1876), constitutes a selected and precious integral, with the participation of various instrument players and the Musical Instrument Collection of the metropolitan municipality.

 

 

 

 

SELECTIONS FROM THE CLOCKS AND MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS COLLECTION

 

Mechanical Clock

This is the 9th and last clock of Eflaki Dede, who made 9 clocks in his life. The clock is in the form of skeleton clock rendering visible its both inside and outside. The entire brass surface is adorned with decorations carved by Dede. The movements of the clock’s balance that turns to the both sides for one second each, moves up with the connection gears, and gives motion to the four separated dials; as well as the six different musical pieces from the Turkish music played by the music box below are extraordinarily impressive. The clock covered with elegance, dream and the ordeal intended for making the dream come true is entirely a masterwork.

 

 

 

Mechanical Clock

The wooden case of the clock is covered with tortoiseshell and adorned with bronze. Equipped with a quarter player and a helix fitting, the mechanism is winded up once a week; and can be adjusted in such a way as to be able to play the music after each three hours or hourly. It does not play the music with a drum (barrel organ); instead, it uses a organ bellows system creating pipe organ sound, through the sound created by the aluminum pipes in consequence of the air blown by the leather bellows. When the music starts, the animal figures on the top of the clock begin to walk and move their heads, ears and tails. With the music, the curved crystals at the bottom of the clock begin to turn in the form of waterfall, and the boats and sailing boats begin to move. 4 different music tones are played. It is made for the Turkish market, so, its white enamel dial has Turkish numbers. The mechanism is extremely complicated, labor demanding and one of the highest-degree examples in its kind.

 

 

CLOCKS AND MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
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Adres: TBMM Genel Sekreterliği (Milli Saraylar), Dolmabahçe Sarayı - Beşiktaş / İSTANBUL Tel: 212 236 90 00 - Faks 212 227 66 73